Unleashing Leadership: Unlocking Greatness and Embracing Change

Team Interview - Living It

November 03, 2023 Travis Maus Season 2 Episode 55
Unleashing Leadership: Unlocking Greatness and Embracing Change
Team Interview - Living It
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Wondering how to develop an environment where self-assessment isn't just accepted, but embraced? Well, you're in the right place! On this episode of Unleashing Leadership, we dive into a fascinating conversation about fostering a climate where self-evaluation is the norm. We discuss how being open to feedback and constructive criticism can fuel personal growth, and how leading with humility can foster a trusting, collaborative team environment.

We also peel back the layers of individual traits within a team setup and their crucial role in effective collaboration. Understanding each team member's unique qualities can prevent mistrust and lack of commitment, thus boosting team harmony. We shed light on the delicate art of identifying when someone may not be a good fit for the team, and how to help them transition positively. We also analyze the concept of trust and how it directly impacts team dynamics. Tune in for an episode that will revolutionize the way you view leadership and team building!

📘 Purchase Ideal Team Player with the link below:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EGCAOA8/?coliid=IRI1RKR1LJCQ9&colid=3C5OKZF0U2T0V&psc=0&ref_=list_c_wl_lv_vv_lig_dp_it

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📧 Send him an email at tmaus@nqrmedia.com

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Speaker 1:

This is unleashing leadership, and I'm your host, travis Moss, and you are listening to our special eight episode mini series on our team interview for the ideal team player. Let's jump right in, all right? So, dave, you're making an important point before we cut you off completely.

Speaker 2:

Yes, let's rewind. Okay, so before you started rambling Travis, you were going somewhere.

Speaker 1:

I was going somewhere and then, you know, I got, the bus broke down.

Speaker 2:

There was actually two points. I made a no and this actually connects both of them. So look at that. So you started going somewhere with, like, what we're trying to create with the framework. So what I started hearing was the goal of this is not to create clones of people or robots that are all acting the same way. That's impossible. You're not going to get anything out of that. You can't even do that. You would never want to.

Speaker 2:

But what it does is it gives the vocabulary, it opens the conversation and it lets the guard down for people to have this conversation. And when it becomes normal speak of the culture or the company to say, if you say hungry, humble, smart, someone knows what you're talking about, and it becomes normal to self assess or to have the conversation, to assess each other and being open to it. You said earlier, jess, you're not smart kind of joking but it's okay to have the conversation of. This is somewhere. If we can work on this or we're conscious of it, you'll accelerate. You'll have a whole different perspective and conversations with people. So I think you have to use the framework in the right way. It has to just be the opening to say this is now, it's okay to talk about this. It's actually encouraged not even okay, it's encouraged to talk about this as a company and as people to get better personally and professionally. And that's how it could best be used, not to create this like cult type of thing in the company that you're trying to operate in.

Speaker 3:

And just to kind of I guess, kind of jump off of that into applications, right. One of the things, especially after reading this book and this is something that I've always believed in but it's sometimes it's hard to have the hard conversations with people sometimes and it's really hard to do, you know, actually do the things, not living it. And it's been interesting even more recently with me just trying to make sure I am embodying some of these things to whatever degree that I can. And I have had a couple of really hard conversations lately with other coworkers that I have a lot of respect for that, you know, because there's either a deficit or they're dorking up my day of in some way shape or form that is not allowing me to be as productive or allowing me to be my best self and just trying to really hone in on the smart way to approach it and communicate in a most effective manner. And in those conversations have gone really well and it's like you can, I know.

Speaker 3:

I believe in my core that, okay, if I can do these things, you're showing other people that they can do these things and it's only going to make them level up. I want people to have those conversations with me and say man, you're. You know, jess, you really dorked up my day because you did XYZ. I want that feedback, I welcome that feedback. And one thing I keep coming back to in just having my own internal dialogue, it's respect. I have enough respect for my colleagues that I want them to improve, I want them to be better and I want them to have enough respect for me to say those hard things to me too, so that I can be better. So you know, it's it's.

Speaker 1:

I love dorking up my day. I you know, I haven't heard you say that before.

Speaker 3:

That's another t-shirt.

Speaker 1:

That's a good one. I know that that could be on a hat. Actually. Don't dork up my day. You are a bumper sticker. That would be a perfect. I have a bumper sticker that says don't read the next line and it says you little, something like you, little rebel. I like you underneath that, right, I need to get another bumper sticker that says don't dork up my day. That would be really good.

Speaker 2:

But what?

Speaker 1:

you're what you're talking about. What you're talking about really embodies the point about humbleness, because you really have to be humble. I mean humble required to be able to open yourself up, to accept that. And the only way that you can do that is if you feel comfortable in the fact that you are surrounded by people who are Leading with the same virtues, because you want to make sure if I open up vulnerability, if I'm humble enough to say I want to get better and, dave, I want you to come to me and tell me when I need to get better. If I'm comfortable enough doing that, you know you need to that the person on the other side of that needs to make sure that they're not Using that from from a manipulative standpoint or from an advantageous standpoint, trying to take advantage of it. Right, because what.

Speaker 1:

I'm saying is, you know, to to the most entry-level person, to the top of the food chain. I Want to get better, and if you recognize something that I can do to get better, please bring it to me. And if somebody uses that as trying to get leverage or something like that, then then then that is very Dangerous. So, number one, it takes a lot of humbleness to do that, but, number two, it requires us actually to surround ourselves and hold everybody around us accountable to those standards, so that we can trust in the fact. And this is, you know, when we talk about ideal team players and we talk about team of teams, you can't have any of this without trust.

Speaker 1:

Yes and so one of the gut-check realities that you have, when you take a framework like this and you say, okay, this is what we're gonna live by is if people are not strong and I like to say if you can be if you're deficient, if, let's say, you're really not good at one of these three areas, it's gonna be really hard to catch up because you're just not that type of person. And it doesn't mean you're a bad person, just means you don't fit that culture right. And If you really pour it two areas maybe not deficient, but like near average or slightly below average right You're really not gonna be able to keep up with this because it's it's a lot to work on, it's a lot to it's a lot of Personal pressure to try to get up to standards yet alone. Everybody else is growing. Everybody else is developing so fast because they bought into this, they trust each other. They're coming up with each other and saying, hey, I saw you were struggling with this, maybe you could say this on the phone next time. Or that person you send them an email and they respond a certain way. Next time Call them. You know all like the little things that we do. Everybody's into helping each other. Somebody else is just trying to figure out how to like literally Even enter the conversation and the conversation is already raging on, and so one of the things that happens, I think, is when we, once we implement this and we're walking around and we're talking about problems, it also gives us the dialogue to be able to say what the problem is.

Speaker 1:

So the problem isn't necessarily a person. So and I think that it's easy to blame things on people. So you can't go and say, hey, that's Justin's problem, justin's the problem. You can, but you can go and say Justin's really struggling with the fact that you know, he's not very humble and it comes across in meetings and it comes across and in you know the way that he's interacting in group settings and it's a really big issue. And he's also not accepting of feedback. He's he's not that the smart skill, what that would be required for him to accept feedback and make personal change. That doesn't seem to be working either.

Speaker 1:

So it's not that Justin's a bad person. Is that he's missing some of these things and he may have incredible skills and talents in like different spaces and and he might have, you know, other virtues that he lives by. That are equally as admirable. But the reason why he's not jiving with the team, the reason why that there's a trust loss or people are like, oh, I don't want to deal with that guy, Probably comes back to something in that scale being off, because we can deal with different personalities, right, we can deal with, oh, that's a, that's a, you know, a number cruncher guy and if you're gonna talk to him, you got to talk numbers and and that's a passion guy.

Speaker 1:

If you can talk to him, it's gonna be fast forward and and that's a hype guy. If you're gonna talk to him, you know it's just, you know it's all hype and this is more of a reserved person. If you're gonna talk to them, tone down, cool it down a little bit. But what you can't do is get somebody you know who just doesn't buy into what you buy and they're like look, yeah, I'm hungry for me, I'm here for me, okay, I, that doesn't make you bad. There are people who do amazing things because they're in it for them. It just means that you can't be on a team of people that are not Leading with. I'm in it for me, you know, and so it helps you. Identify it, I guess, is we can look at the person. Instead of saying he's a bad person, just say you know they're like that hungry.

Speaker 1:

Quality is off a little bit, and that's probably not something that we can fix as a team. So we need to help them figure out how to move on and that's some of that hard part. Yes, I think that you're talking about is because sometimes you wake up and you realize that maybe you have friends, or maybe you have family, or maybe you have colleagues that are just in a different boat and You've got to put up some kind of boundaries because you want to be able to trust and you want to be able to have people trust you, and you're trying to figure out why there's friction and and, and you know it's unfortunately, you know sometimes who are putting around us.

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