Unleashing Leadership: Unlocking Greatness and Embracing Change

Team Interview - Learning "Smart"

November 02, 2023 Travis Maus Season 2 Episode 54
Unleashing Leadership: Unlocking Greatness and Embracing Change
Team Interview - Learning "Smart"
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

What if the key to effective leadership was not solely intellectual prowess, but a combination of emotional intelligence and the traits of hunger and humility?  We kick-off by diving into the often-underestimated role of emotional intelligence (EIQ) in leadership. Discover why cognizance of others' emotions can set you apart as a successful leader. We also shed light on the characteristics of being hungry and humble—traits that aren't imitable but deeply ingrained in genuine leaders.

Did you know that the manner in which you deliver, receive, and reciprocate information can drastically impact your leadership effectiveness? Our conversation takes a turn towards the art of smart communication. It's not just about speaking—it's about understanding, empathizing, and meeting halfway with those you're communicating with. We dissect the importance of these soft skills in leadership, and encourage you to self-reflect and hone your communication abilities. Let's take this journey of self-improvement together.

📘 Purchase Ideal Team Player with the link below:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EGCAOA8/?coliid=IRI1RKR1LJCQ9&colid=3C5OKZF0U2T0V&psc=0&ref_=list_c_wl_lv_vv_lig_dp_it

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📧 Send him an email at tmaus@nqrmedia.com

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Speaker 1:

This is unleashing leadership, and I'm your host, travis Moss, and you are listening to our special eight episode mini series on our team interview for the ideal team player. Let's jump right in.

Speaker 2:

It's EIQ, eiq, emotional IQ Okay.

Speaker 1:

I like this. That's another T-shirt. Yeah, eiq.

Speaker 2:

But I mean, that's what it is. It's like an emotional IQ, it's people smarts. It's how can you like understanding? You know, okay, how is Travis's brain work. God help us, Lord knows.

Speaker 2:

But like and then how can I effectively communicate what I need to communicate to Travis right now, like that is, and being able to be smart enough to be able to have that conversation and work with people so that they're not automatically defensive and not put on edge, and kind of being able to kind of approach people in a way. So awareness is a good word Awareness.

Speaker 3:

Awareness was the word used and what you were just saying, jess, rubbing people the wrong way type of thing, right yeah, like not. I would never do that, yeah, travis never does that so he's very smart. Frustrating people, right. Yeah, you're trying to get your point across, but you're doing it in a way like awareness of the audience. I think you could use awareness in different aspects, right, and not giving good feedback. It's like that that constructive feedback, in a way that the person is going to receive it the way you want it, right.

Speaker 2:

Yes.

Speaker 3:

Like your intention was good, right, but we'll assume the intention was good.

Speaker 2:

Yes, this is not the evil smart, this is the good smart yeah exactly.

Speaker 3:

But if the smarts is not there, if the awareness isn't there, you could look at seed right. I could address probably everybody in a little bit of a different way to maximize that connection. And that's the smart part, right, like I have to understand what is that way to address them. I thought about this one because that smart is interesting to me. I feel like smart can be learned, but I say that with I almost look at it as there's a gateway. You need the other two, you need to be hungry and humble before we could talk about smart or getting better with smart right, because I think where the smart is misused right, you're manipulating it's when you don't have the other two, right? First.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 3:

Because once you have like hungry and humble, I have a hard time thinking you can teach those Right. I do think those Great. It's an inherent characteristic that that person has right. Yeah, you walk in the door with those. You walk in the door, you can't.

Speaker 1:

You might amplify them a little bit. You might be like create a situation around them to amplify it, but you can't force that upon somebody.

Speaker 3:

Right In the right environment, right the right. You're going to amplify those things in the right way and it's going to accelerate that person. But you can't manufacture it. You cannot manufacture hungry and humble. There has to be a baseline there that you can amplify in the right situation. No-transcript If you have those two, I feel like that opens the gateway. Now there's also a baseline with smart, but I think you can learn smart situationally through experience. If you are humble, you understand. Okay, maybe that interaction wasn't great. I'm going to own that. Go back to accountability. I'm going to own that. I'm going to talk to that person. I'm going to reflect on how I handled that and how I think that could have went better. That's where you can learn smart and get better at it, because you have the right intention behind it. You already passed the first two tests. You're able to improve that in a way that's going to be beneficial to anyone you interact with.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think in a lot of ways, maybe smart. For instance, you said awareness is about how you're deliberately communicating with people. I'd like to circle back to that in a minute. Smart is one of those things that you probably never stop learning and you never stop improving on. For instance, you might deliberately deliver something in a way to provoke a reaction.

Speaker 1:

You're being very smart because you're doing that on purpose, even if the other person doesn't want to hear it or hear it that way. Or if you accidentally do it through impulse or something like that, then that's very different. You can have a happy accident. I call them happy accidents when you don't know you're doing something but it turns out well. The question is, when you're doing a good job with being smart, is it because it was accidental or is it because we were being very deliberate with what we were trying to do and we were very aware of what we were trying to do? Good or bad if I'm trying to instigate on purpose or if I'm trying to properly communicate or relieve some pressure someplace. But I think with the communication in our next series we get into surrounded by idiots. I think that book probably lives in the smart section here, because it's how people communicate.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely.

Speaker 1:

One of the things I was talking about communication in that book is, when you communicate, there are three things that you're doing you are receiving, you are delivering and you are reciprocating. Maybe in different order there, but I communicate with you. I say something to you to provoke a reaction, you respond. So probably, receive, respond, reciprocate I think it's how I phrase it. I throw something out there in the form of communication to you, you respond to it, you reciprocate. I respond to how you responded. Being smart means that I understand. I think, jess, you had said this and I think, dave, you were enforced it. I understand.

Speaker 1:

I'm trying to meet you in the middle with how you particularly communicate, because one of the problems with this is just because we're talking about needing to line up with the framework. It doesn't make us all identical communicators and identical workers and identical passions. We're talking about principles that we live by, but not actually how we live our life and who our personalities are. And that's where the smart part comes in, because it says, dave, you have methods of communication that I have not developed yet and I have ways that I work with people that are not natural to you. And same thing with you, jess, and you can go down the line with everybody you know, and we can get stuck sometimes in this idea that I need you to. Just, I'm not going to make any effort to try to communicate with you about the way you process information and you're not going to make any effort to try to communicate with me with the way I process information.

Speaker 1:

And I think that that's the epitome of smart is when you figure out I need to meet you in the middle someplace, and if I can get you, if I can help you become smarter about this too, you're more willing to meet me in the middle. We can maybe connect the dots faster because we're, we've bought into this idea that well, number one, I think you have to want to be smart. So I think it's still. You walk in the door with it like you walked into the door, being humble and hungry. You have the desire to do things the right way and to treat people correctly Doesn't mean that you're perfect at it. You don't screw up. But because that desire, you reflect on it and you learn and you say okay, I'm going to try to round whatever rough edge I have.

Unleashing Leadership
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